Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

The Lancer Feed

Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

The Lancer Feed

Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

The Lancer Feed

Due to a shortage of ten custodians, custodian Andrew Doyle begins his after school shift after being rehired to Lafayette from Crestview Middle School three months ago. “We are very short handed. It affects us by more than 50%,” Doyle said.
Support staff openings create additional responsibilities for current staff
May 16, 2024
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People of Lafayette: Elise Morton

Freshman enjoys playing the oboe for its uniqueness
Although+being+only+one+of+the+two+oboe+players+in+the+school%2C+freshman+Elise+Morton+said+she+will+continue+playing+the+instrument+throughout+high+school.+%E2%80%9C%5BPlaying+the+oboe%5D+makes+me+feel+special+because+I+know+Im+playing+a+rare+instrument+and+I+love+having+a+challenge+because+there%E2%80%99s+something+to+improve+on+and+get+even+better%2C%E2%80%9D+Morton+said.
Courtesy of Elise Morton
Although being only one of the two oboe players in the school, freshman Elise Morton said she will continue playing the instrument throughout high school. “[Playing the oboe] makes me feel special because I know I’m playing a rare instrument and I love having a challenge because there’s something to improve on and get even better,” Morton said.

Currently, freshman Elise Morton is the only oboe in Symphonic Band and one of two in the entire school. Senior Lana Dauw is the only other oboist.

Morton began playing the oboe in 6th grade, after being introduced to the instrument during a mouthpiece test, and has enjoyed it ever since.

The mouthpiece test can help decide which instrument is best for whom. The test does this by seeing which mouthpiece a student can match pitch with easiest, to guide them into choosing the instrument that suits them best.

“I was immediately good with the oboe’s mouthpiece testing,” she said.

Morton said the oboe is limited in what it can do. For example, the instrument is too fragile to march in the Lancer Regiment, leading to a decline in interest.

Because of the lack of students playing the instrument, Morton feels a little more stressed about playing the oboe.

“I’m probably going to have more parts or more solos that are more important [next year],” she said.

Morton said she has improved significantly since she started playing, learning new techniques along the way. She’s currently working on her airstream techniques so she can hold out notes longer and more clearly.

“Even though people are saying it’s an endangered instrument, I love playing the oboe because of its uniqueness. The melodies it can create help transform normal songs into something beautiful,” Morton said.

Next year, Morton will continue being one of two oboe players in the school as a new freshman will play the instrument.

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