Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

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Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

The Lancer Feed

Lafayette High School news. Student-run.

The Lancer Feed

Rockwood School District is currently writing a curriculum for a new womens history course, which will be offered in the 2025-2026 school year. Social studies teacher Jodie Lee will teach it at LHS.
Women's history course to be offered during 2025-2026 school year
April 9, 2024
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The Perks of Being a Wallflower: a unique perspective

Stephen Chbosky provides guidance on navigating high school as a ‘wallflower’
The+Perks+of+Being+a+Wallflower+has+been+a+%231%C2%A0New+York+Times+bestseller%2C+and+has+won+many+awards%2C+including+the+American+Library+Association+Best+Book+for+Young+Adults+award+%282000%29.+The+book+has+been+challenged+and+banned+at+high+schools+across+the+nation%2C+although+Lafayettes+Library+still+has+four+copies.
Sonya Sud
The Perks of Being a Wallflower has been a #1 New York Times bestseller, and has won many awards, including the American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults award (2000). The book has been challenged and banned at high schools across the nation, although Lafayette’s Library still has four copies.

Placed on the American Library Association’s Most Banned Book list for depiction of sexual abuse, LGBTQIA+ content, drug use, profanity and possibly sexually explicit scenes, The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky is a transitionary, coming-of-age book that teaches teens to embrace life.

I read The Perks of Being a Wallflower when I was a freshman. At the time, I had pretty bad social anxiety, and The Perks of Being a Wallflower was one of the first books that made me feel seen. 

The book follows Charlie, the main character, as he navigates life as a high schooler with social anxiety and other mental health issues. What’s different about this book is that rather than being about an outgoing popular kid, Charlie is someone who feels like he’s an outsider, an observer and a wallflower.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower follows Charlie as he goes to his first party, among other ‘typical’ high school experiences. What’s unique about his story, though, is that throughout these situations, rather than engaging in the settings, Charlie watches them. He feels like he isn’t the main character of his own life, which is why he refers to himself as an “other”. For someone like me who sometimes found it hard to leave the house due to social anxiety, I understood where Charlie was coming from. I related to the thoughts and feelings Charlie experienced as he realized he felt like a spectator.

Throughout the book, Charlie learns how to be present in life and how to leave his self-imposed isolation. Although the book touches on some mature themes like alcohol, drugs and sexual abuse, it doesn’t glamorize those topics. In fact, those topics are vital in the plot of the story, as they all contribute to Charlie’s path of self-discovery. 

The book ends with Charlie being admitted to a mental hospital and coming to terms with his childhood abuse. By the last page, he promises to participate in life instead of just being a wallflower. Charlie faced his problems and recognized that it was time for him to embrace life, which is what teens might try to model after reading the book.

Rather than banning The Perks of Being a Wallflower teenagers should be able to recognize whether or not the mature themes in the book are something they can handle. No one has to read the book, but it certainly shouldn’t be banned for teens who want to read it, especially because it might help them figure out a bit of how to navigate high school. Reading The Perks of Being a Wallflower can help teens who feel like outsiders learn how to overcome or at least battle some of their social anxieties.

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About the Contributor
Sonya Sud, Editor in Chief
Grade: Senior Pronouns: She/Her Years on Staff: 3 Hobbies and Interests: Reading, Netflixing (yes, I made Netflix a verb) Favorite Quote: “Be who you are and say how you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.” - Dr. Seuss Favorite Hot Take: Sleep is for the weak. Fun Fact: My favorite food is lemons!
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